Finnish National Association of Snowsport Instructors

Finnish National Association of Snowsport Instructors ( shortened: FNASI/SHOry) was founded in 1966. It is a training organization serving some 1000 individual members, ski schools and ski areas in the areas of competence development and sports education. Our primary role is to train professional snowsport instructors. FNASI delivers training in Finland and in other countries upon request.

FNASI actively participates in the development of snowsport business and promotes co-operation between ski schools, ski areas and government officials in order to ensure best possible learning experience for the end customer.

As a member association of ISIA (International Ski Instructor Association) FNASI training system is fully compatible with ISIA minimum standards.

FNASI training system is fully compatible with the European Union CTT requirements, enabling a ski instructor to achieve the highest level of professional qualification in Europe.

Courses


The FNASI Snowsport Instructor training system comprises a 3 level course structure for delivering the technical and pedagogical skills needed when working as an alpine, cross-country and/or snowboard instructor.

In addition to the 3 level of courses, the training system includes various special skills modules. The underlying idea behind the course structure is that the threshold for entering the level 1 course is set low enough to allow anyone interested to access the training system, while allowing individual pace of advancement and progression.

To get more information about the training courses, schedules and booking, please contact us: shory@hiihdonopettajat.com

Take a look at the training system chart.

The training system comprises a 3 level course structure for delivering the technical, tactical and pedagogical skills needed in alpine, cross-country and snowboard instruction. The alpine ski instructor courses are complemented by snowboarding and vice versa. In addition to the 3 level courses, the training system includes various special skills modules, which can be arranged at various Finnish ski areas. The underlying idea behind the course structure is that the threshold for entering the level 1 course is set low enough to allow anyone interested to access the training system, while allowing individual pace of advancement and progression.

The basic courses are described here for alpine skiing. The same basic training course structure also applies to snowboarding, while the complementary snow sports are different.

Level 1 Course, 8 days, 70 hours

Course Content
– Basic instruction training and individual skills (4,5 days)
– Teaching tactics and methodology, including teaching children (2 days)
– Working as a snowsport instructor + customer service (1 day)
– Working at a ski area (0,5)
– Freestyle part 1

Compulsory practical training at a ski school, 20 hours + reporting, 10 hours
– Keeping a learning diary and control by ski school training responsible

Acquired status and skills after level 1 course:  ski instructor trainee for tasks at basic level and various assistive ski school tasks.

First Aid level 1 course has to be completed before entering a level 2 ski instructor course.

Level 2 Course, 8 days, 70 hours

Course Content
– Basic instruction training and individual skills including giant slalom and tests (3,5 days)
– Teaching tactics and methodology + problem solving + technique analysis training (3 days)
– Co-operative methods / snowboarding (1 day)
– Cross-country skiing (1 day)
– Freestyle part II

Compulsory practical training at a ski school between levels 2 and 3, 20 hours + reporting, 10 hours
– Keeping a learning diary and control by ski school training responsible

After a successful completion of level 2 course including tests, the authorized ski instructor status is granted.

Level 3 course, 8 days

Course Content
– Freestyle part III
– Assistive ski instruction (1 day)
– Ski racing technique (1,5 days)

Compulsory practical training at a ski school after level 3, 20 hours + reporting, 10 hours
– Written account and certification of contribution to the planning and execution of an on-snow training camp (e.g. of one’s own ski school)

Special Skills Courses and Expert Courses as 4-day modules:
Three modules are required for ISIA instructor status
– Snow and mountain security/Snow security (compulsory for all)
– Alpine skiing expert module (can be used, e.g., to enhance one’s skiing skills before entering the level 2 course or after a failed exam to work on one’s skiing).
– Snowboarding
– Telemarking expert module
– Alpine ski racing expert module
– Cross-country module
– Assistive winter sports (disabled skiing)

Modules can be entered at any time during the training progression. For the ISIA instructor status, three completed modules (diplomas) are required.

Each module comprises 3 days of individual skills development, while the fourth day includes a half-day review of the Finnish learning method and another ½ day of testing. Each module can also be considered a training course for maintaining one’s ISIA instructor status.

Learning diary

Each practical teaching training period is completed by a teaching test assessed by the instructor training responsible of the ski school. The learning diary is to be kept up-to-date during teaching training periods. The learning diary also serves as a study credit book as completed modules are entered into it. The learning diary is to be brought along when entering any training occasions, where it serves, e.g. as a basis for discussion on individual skills development. When applying for the ISIA instructor status, the applicant is kindly advised to deliver his or her learning diary to the SHORY office.

The highest standard is the internationally acknowledged ISIA instructor status. In addition to this, FNASI training system enables one to achieve CTT status within European Union nations. This is the official highest level of training for a professional ski instructor.